Indigenous- 
      & Human Rights    

Doctora Mariana and theLost World of the Mby'á- Guaraní

Kampf um Land und Überleben eines Indigenen Volkes

“Without the forest we cannot live, it makes us sad, suicidal, it’s very serious! But Argentinean law tells us; this forest is not ours, so we cannot use it! “ said Hilario Acosta, chief of a Mbyá Guarani tribe.

Since ancient times Mby′a communities lived harmoniously with nature in huge forests among the border triangle of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. On account of extensive deforestation, the Mby′a lost their habitat – the virgin forest!

 

Doctora Mariana, an Argentinian medical doctor with Swiss roots, was not only responsible for the health care of several tribal communities in Misiones, Argentina, but also gave

social assistance and fought for the Mbya Guarani against local corruption.

Dra. Mariana had to leave 2012on a one year sabbatical for Switzerland. She has been intimidated by the government.

“Without the forest we cannot live, it makes us sad, suicidal, it’s very serious! But Argentinean law tells us; this forest is not ours, so we cannot use it! “ said Hilario Acosta, chief of a Mbyá Guarani tribe.

Since ancient times Mby′a communities lived harmoniously with nature in huge forests among the border triangle of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. On account of extensive deforestation, the Mby′a lost their habitat – the virgin forest!

 

Doctora Mariana, an Argentinian medical doctor with Swiss roots, was not only responsible for the health care of several tribal communities in Misiones, Argentina, but also gave

social assistance and fought for the Mbya Guarani against local corruption.

Dra. Mariana had to leave 2012on a one year sabbatical for Switzerland. She has been intimidated by the government.

There is a Version in German, Spanish and a 60 Min Version in English available

Shadow of the long white cloud

 

Maori and Pakhea in Aotearoa – New Zealand

Women heal a nation’s wound

 

The official New Zealand with hindsight to international tourism does still transport a deceitful image of harmony and social justice between the native Maori and the white immigrant New Zealander, the ‘Pakhea’.

 

Two representatives of the organisation ‘1000 women across the world’, a Maori and a Pakhea, give insight and show the socio-political background that lead to destruction of a native people. They talk about poverty, violent machos and drugs in Maori families, but also about new beginnings and chances, education and common environmental actions in our global world. On both sides, there are people, mostly women, who try to reach over the racial gap, to correct colonial misinterpretations of history.

 

Patsy Henderson, a Pakhea, deals with the aftermath of violence in mostly Maori families. Pauline Tangiora, a Maori eldest with a traditional chin tattoo, is a spiritual and health counsel for her tribe. She fights internationally for indigenous rights and environmental causes. Pauline Tangiora brings consensus to the dialog between the ethnics, but at the same time demands the traditional rights of indigenous people to be respected.

Women heal a nation’s wound

 

The official New Zealand with hindsight to international tourism does still transport a deceitful image of harmony and social justice between the native Maori and the white immigrant New Zealander, the ‘Pakhea’.

 

Two representatives of the organisation ‘1000 women across the world’, a Maori and a Pakhea, give insight and show the socio-political background that lead to destruction of a native people. They talk about poverty, violent machos and drugs in Maori families, but also about new beginnings and chances, education and common environmental actions in our global world. On both sides, there are people, mostly women, who try to reach over the racial gap, to correct colonial misinterpretations of history.

 

Patsy Henderson, a Pakhea, deals with the aftermath of violence in mostly Maori families. Pauline Tangiora, a Maori eldest with a traditional chin tattoo, is a spiritual and health counsel for her tribe. She fights internationally for indigenous rights and environmental causes. Pauline Tangiora brings consensus to the dialog between the ethnics, but at the same time demands the traditional rights of indigenous people to be respected.

The Non-Violent Rebel

Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Argentina 1980

Esquivel has a chair for human rights and peace culture at the University of Buenos Aires. One of his aims is, to bring awareness to the younger generation on all levels of this topic!

Esquivel received the Nobel peace prize 1980 because at the time of the Argentinian military junta, he openly worked against the dictatorship in the name of SERPAJ.

SERPAJ stands for interreligious, multi-cultural, non-violence in the Christian sense, and is related to the South American liberation theology.

In 1977 when he was trying to renew his passport, he was arrested at police head quarters .  His family was not informed! After 14 months of torture and prison, international pressure on the Junta grew stronger and one night Adolfo was dumped close to his home without explanation!

 

Adolfo’s mother died early.  His father was unable to provide for the three children and so Adolfo was sent to a Catholic orphanage; his grandmother, was a full blooded Guarani Indian.

Esquivels part-indiginouse roots are also responsible for his vehement involvement working for the right to self-determination for indigenous people and other collective societies and is one of the most important aspects of human rights This includes the right to the preservation of a healthy environment as well as civil rights for each individual citizen and the right to Information from the government!

German Version

There is a Version in German and Spanish available

Mangroves, Indigenous Identity
 and Woman Power

The alternative (environmental ?) career of a Swiss woman in Brazil

 

South America is on the move. A lot of indigenous politicians and local nongovernmental Organisations work on the same mission: getting back ancient lands not only to survive as a people but also to save the environment.

 

One of these activists is Esther Neuhaus, a studied Geographer, born in Switzerland. In spite of her young appearance and age, she is considered a highly qualified expert on environmental and social questions in Brazil. Esther manages the controlling body of more than 500 non-governmental Brazilian environment, social and development organizations.

 

She is specialised in communal tourism and established a worldwide network. Environment and tourism cannot be separated from each other. It is important that local, indigenous communities gain control over development. As selfsupporting  farmers, fishermen hunters, they are dependent on a healthy environment. Local tourism brings additional income. The responsibility and organization strengthens their social skills , and guarantees an intact environment.

 

In that context Esther is also involved to observe the deforestation of mangrove forests. Esther got a mandate to organize a series of events at this 5th Social Forum in Porto Alegre In Brazil.

Because organization and funding of a tourism - workshop for indigenous Mapuche people in Argentina did not progress correctly, Esther Neuhaus visited the Mapuche women Moira, to advocate capacity building and look into the problem personally.

Esther is convinced, that sometimes it is not enough to discuss problems but do something on the spot.

 

The Mapuche Moira Milan lives in Patagonia, Argentina, and belongs to Esther’s international tourism network. Among the Mapuche villages facing land problems Moira has built an organization to fight for the return of their ancestral lands. She is also trying to start community-based tourism to improve their income.

Mapuches live off small-scale agriculture. In midsummer they offer a campsite to tourists, act as mountain guides and hope for proper training. They dream of carefully developed community-based tourism in order to gain supplementary income. At the same time they could secure their proximity to nature, their spirituality, symbolism and traditions.